thehippykids:

thevictoryrose:

wood-woolI took a 7 week coast to coast road trip after being laid off from Boeing. I didn’t have a camper but realized that being able to pull off the road at a rest or truck stop was the way to go to make the trip affordable. With a few sheets of 1/2” plywood and misc. hardware this is what I came up with. The effort was well worth the time and materials

cool come make me one

2 months ago with 181874 notes
Be very, very careful what you put into that head, because you’ll never, ever get it out. — Thomas Cardinal Wolsey   (via dissapolnted)
2 months ago with 28668 notes

I am very serious about everything and I am holding puppies

2 months ago with 138002 notes

chroniclesofamber:

Cyber-Dys-Punk-Topia

“There was a place near an airport, Kowloon, when Hong Kong wasn’t China, but there had been a mistake, a long time ago, and that place, very small, many people, it still belonged to China. So there was no law there. An outlaw place. And more and more people crowded in; they built it up, higher. No rules, just building, just people living. Police wouldn’t go there. Drugs and whores and gambling. But people living, too. Factories, restaurants. A city. No laws.

William Gibson, Idoru

It was the most densely populated place on Earth for most of the 20th century, where a room cost the equivalent of US$6 per month in high rise buildings that belonged to no country. In this urban enclave, “a historical accident”, law had no place. Drug dealers, pimps and prostitutes lived and worked alongside kindergartens, and residents walked the narrow alleys with umbrellas to shield themselves from the endless, constant dripping of makeshift water pipes above….

Kowloon ‘Walled’ City lost its wall during the Second World War when Japan invaded and razed the walls for materials to expand the nearby airport. When Japan surrendered, claims of sovereignty over Kowloon finally came to a head between the Chinese and the British. Perhaps to avoid triggering yet another conflict in the wake of a world war, both countries wiped their hands of the burgeoning territory.

And then came the refugees, the squatters, the outlaws. The uncontrolled building of 300 interconnected towers crammed into a seven-acre plot of land had begun and by 1990, Kowloon was home to more than 50,000 inhabitants….

Despite earning its Cantonese nickname, “City of Darkness”, amazingly, many of Kowloon’s residents liked living there. And even with its lack of basic amenities such as sanitation, safety and even sunlight, it’s reported that many have fond memories of the friendly tight-knit community that was “poor but happy”.

“People who lived there were always loyal to each other. In the Walled City, the sunshine always followed the rain,” a former resident told the South China Morning Post….

Today all that remains of Kowloon is a bronze small-scale model of the labyrinth in the middle a public park where it once stood.

This isn’t to say places like Kowloon Walled City no longer exist in Hong Kong….

— from Anywhere But Here: Kowloon “Anarchy” City

2 months ago with 39899 notes
2 months ago with 2288 notes

"Her and Lost In Translation are connected to each other. They’re very much on the same wavelength. They explore a lot of the same ideas. This all makes sense since Spike Jonze and Sofia Coppola were married from 1999 to 2003 and had been together for many years before that. Sofia Coppola had already made her big personal statement in regards to love and marriage right when the couple was on the verge of divorce; Her would be Spike Jonze’s answer to those feelings. What makes it even more poignant is that Her never feels resentful or petty. It feels more like a legitimate apology. It’s an acknowledgement that, in the end, some people aren’t meant to be with each other in the long run. Some people do grow apart. Lost in Translation is about a couple on the verge of growing apart, Her is about finally letting go of the person you’ve grown apart with and moving on.”

2 months ago with 30475 notes
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2 months ago with 24613 notes

When Marie-Antoinette is going through her shoes while preparing for a big party you see a pair of blue Converse All Star 1923 Chuck Taylor basketball shoes for about one and a half seconds. While these shoes were definitely not in existence at the time of Marie-Antoinette, their inclusion in the film was intentional, to portray Marie-Antoinette as a typical teenage girl despite the time she lived in. (x)

2 months ago with 15963 notes

glamourweaver:

Yvette Nicole Brown wrote this joke based on actual experience with directors who didn’t want to use the word “sassy”  but 100% wanted her to play it sassier.

2 months ago with 62119 notes

hollywoodmarcia:

Her (2013)

2 months ago with 21141 notes

heygraciela:

this is the gayest show ever and i love it

2 months ago with 44330 notes

galaxycosmos:

This is probably my favourite video on the internet… (Its only 30 seconds!)

GloZell shows why cultural representation is so important without really meaning too. 

2 months ago with 180947 notes
2 months ago with 65573 notes
starponds